Peloton bike for newbies — one year later

by lachicaruns on

A year ago, I write about what to consider before getting a Peloton stationary bike. A few friends have since asked me if I was still using the Peloton as much, and whether I thought it was worth the rather-large investment.

The short answer is yes and yes. Here’s a bit more detail if you’re still on the fence about getting a Peloton:

  • Peloton resources. I have watched a couple of the set-up videos again, especially about the height of the bike to accommodate my height (5-foot-5). But it’s been quite a while and I now automatically just know which settings to use without even thinking about it. As for the Peloton Facebook group, I genuinely couldn’t handle it after a month or two. Those people are nuts about their bikes. Lesson learned: You may fall in love with the bike and may want to wax poetic about each and every one of your rides. That’s just not for me.
  • Comfort. Once I got padded shorts and learned how to properly sit with my bum in the very back of the seat, I haven’t had any problems with pain or discomfort. Lesson learned: Invest in a few basics like proper shorts and shoes. Just like with other sports, it’s always worth spending a little bit of money for the gear.
  • Difficulty. It took a few months, but I can now easily handle an hour-long class. I found it very important to test out  a few coaches before settling on someone whose personality, music and difficulty fit my needs. I’m currently partial to my boo Cosby Rigsby, in large part because he’s encouraging and positive, and plays Latin music. Oh, you noticed he’s good looking? Yeah, there’s that. Lesson learned: There are literally dozens of potential combinations of coaches, music, length and difficulty. Try a few things, then try a few more. You will find the right fit and will enjoy the variety.
  • Shoes. I found my shoes to be a bit uncomfortable and almost gave up on them. Instead, I now wear slightly thicker socks and my feet feel great. I still can’t clip and un-clip with ease, so I just leave my shoes in all the time. El husbando takes them off when he uses the bike and has yet to complain. It works for us. Lesson learned: Some of the classes involve a lot of getting up from the seat and — if you’re dancing with Cody — sometimes even some dancing. I don’t think I could do half what I do on the bike without the stability that comes from the cycling shoes.
  • It’s still biking. Yes, but this klutz also feel a whole lot safer. Since I’ve since had my fourth shoulder surgery, I appreciate that I don’t have to worry about falling. Or being chased by dogs. Or swallowing bugs. Lesson learned: I thought the experience would encourage me to get a real bike. Meh. I don’t see a reason to at this point.
  • Consistency. Absolutely my most-favorite thing about the Peloton is that I can ride it any time of day year-round. I’ve used it before the sun came up and just before bedtime. The bike helped me stay active right after my shoulder surgery and during periods when I’ve been injured and benched from running. And I got a ride in earlier this week when the temperatures were double-digits…below zero. Lesson learned. The Peloton bike has been one of the best things I’ve done for my running. It’s great cross-training that I can easily squeeze in, even on the busiest of days.

So is a Peloton bike for you? Considering the bike with all of the gear and a year’s worth of classes cost more than my first car, you would think that I might hesitate before answering that question.

Given how much use el husbando and I have gotten out of it, it certainly has been a great investment for us. Going in, I wasn’t really sure whether I would either enjoy using it or whether I would really include it as part of my training plan. But I’m pleased to look back and see how it’s become an integral part of my weekly training plan — a plan that my sports medicine and manipulative medicine doctors both agree is the right one for me.

So, have you gotten a Peloton? Still planning on getting one? Why or why not? (You may have to click on “Continue Reading” to leave a comment.)

Written by: lachicaruns

My name is Gisgie. It's pronounced geese (like the birds) and gee (like the letter). Now that we've met, I'm glad you're here. I'm an injury-prone runner who manages to find reasons to keep coming back to the road despite ongoing challenges. Most recently, I've struggled with piriformis syndrome. I'm currently winning. Most days.

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